They are usually intended for use in public places, and intended for the short- or long-term private use of individuals for storing clothing or other personal items. Users may rent a locker for a single use or for a period of time for repeated use. Some lockers are offered as a free service to people partaking of certain activities that require the safekeeping of personal items.
Lockers are only available to currently enrolled students and current employees.  The University is not responsible for the contents of any locker.  Users must use the lock provided by Roosevelt University.  No stickers or posters are allowed on the lockers.  No dangerous or illegal items may be stored in lockers at any time.  Items causing unpleasant odors are not allowed.  Lockers must be able to be fully closed at all times.   Roosevelt University reserves the right to open lockers at its discretion at any time and to remove any items it believes compromises the safety or environmental quality of Roosevelt University.   Roosevelt University reserves the rights to charge for damages to the locker and may cancel this rental agreement at any time for any reason.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
There are a number of features or characteristics which may vary in lockers. Because purchasers will need to specify what they want in each of these when ordering, it is more common to order a particular configuration rather than buy "off the shelf" in a shop, although certain very common configurations can be found in shops fairly easily. These features include:
“In many cases, they’re [homeless] building things like little shanty towns, bringing furniture in and camping out. There have been incidents at night where there have been brawls or loud arguments happening at 3, 4 a.m. waking people up. I do know that several neighbors have complained that they have found human waste in their yards,” said Romero.
Est. in 1936, Salsbury Industries is home to both our lockers.com & mailboxes.com websites. The industry leader in the manufacturing & distributing of quality metal lockers, wood lockers, plastic lockers & storage solutions. Salsbury Industries manufacturing facilities are vertically integrated. Headquartered just minutes from downtown Los Angeles.
Teaming up with the Saint Francis Center, Denver is also planning on adding 200 more storage spaces at the organization’s employment service center, located near the city’s capital building. The contract between the city of Denver and the Saint Francis Center will start on June 1 and with $130,000 for the first year of storage space. After that, the center will be given $100,000 a year if the contract continues.
Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
Sloping tops: while most lockers have flat tops, some manufacturers offer the option of sloping tops to their range of lockers. The slope may be of either 30 degrees or 45 degrees to the horizontal, sloping towards the front, and the purpose of this is to make it impossible to store items on top of the lockers, or to make it harder for dust or other debris to accumulate there. This is an important factor in places like food-processing factories or restaurants where hygiene requirements must be met.

Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.


There is an honest way for supporters of a nationwide popular vote to eject the Electoral College, and that is to take away its accreditation by way of a constitutional amendment to repeal it. But that would take 2/3 of both houses of Congress and 3/4 of the states, and apparently that task gives opponents of the Electoral College the vapors.Much easier, they think, to perform an end-run on the US Constitution's amendment process through the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact.Interstate compacts are for regional cooperation in governing the use of river water, for example, or in agreeing that if a nurse in one state passes that state's licensing requirements, other states will accept that nurse's license to practice.Interstate compacts are not for the purpose of subverting the US Constitution.I hate the Electoral College, it's antiquated and obsolete, in my opinion. But I don't support the NPVIC.If people think our politics are divisive now, just wait to see what happens if the NPVIC is adopted by 270 electoral votes' worth of states.So, call Governor Polis' office at 303-866-2471 and tell him to veto senate bill 19-042, the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. Be sure to mention the bill number! I do, however, like the idea of proportional electoral votes from each state. Winner-take-all is nowhere mentioned in any form in the US Constitution. Maine and Nebraska have the right idea.
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