Clean/dirty lockers normally have two or three parts within the locker. One part is meant for dirty or clothes that are worn, and the other side for clean clothes. These lockers are meant for hospitals or other medical workplaces where it is useful to keep work and personal clothes apart to reduce the risk of infection. These lockers are also useful for factories where work clothes can become dirty and it can be very useful to keep them apart from personal clothes.


Some schools in the United States have been reported to have abolished the use of lockers. Security concerns are cited as the reason for this, with the concern being that lockers may be used to store contraband items such as weapons or drugs or pornographic material.[1] There has been some controversy over in what circumstances school authorities or law-enforcement officials are permitted to search lockers, with or without informing the users, or with or without the users being present at the time of the search, and it has been considered a civil liberties issue, particularly in the U.S.
Stored my luggage for several hours at Lugden. Great location just across the street from Union Station. Spoke with the owner and he said he owns the parking spot so they are always there during the day. Prices were reasonable and I felt comfortable storing my bags there while I explored Denver. The owner was nice and gave me coupons for some local businesses.
Tiers: may be specified as single-tier (full height), two-tier, three-tier, etc., meaning that the lockers are stacked on top of each other in layers two high, three high, etc. Tiers are commonly up to eight high; on occasion, even more tiers may be found, in the case of very small lockers for such purposes as storing laptop computers. The most common numbers of tiers found in lockers are, in order, one, two, and four; three-tier lockers are rather less common, and other numbers such as five, six, or eight even less common still - seven almost non-existent. Since locker cabinets are most commonly 6 feet (182.9 cm.) high (although there are exceptions), the height of individual lockers varies according to how many tiers are accommodated within the cabinet. The height of individual lockers is usually approximately 6 feet (182.9 cm.) divided by the number of tiers, so that two-tier lockers are about 3 feet (91.4 cm.) high, three-tier lockers 2 feet (61 cm.) high, four-tier lockers 1.5 feet (45.7 cm.) high, and so on. Standard features often vary according to the number of tiers: single-tier lockers usually include a shelf about a foot (roughly 30 cm.) from the top, and a hanging rail (sometimes with one or two hooks) immediately underneath that, at the top of the large compartment beneath the shelf; two- or three-tier lockers usually lack the shelf, but include the hanging rail; lockers with four or more tiers usually have none of these fittings, but consist of just the bare compartment.

Other advocates of lockerless schools also cite reasons such as reducing noise by eliminating the clang of dozens of locker doors,[1] or creating a more appealing environment aesthetically. It has also been claimed that removing lockers provides good training for students by forcing them to be more efficient in managing their books, and taking the time to plan what books they will need, and carrying only those ones.
Bank size: It does not necessarily refer to the total number of compartments, but rather the number of compartments wide the entire cabinet is. So a bank of three may contain six lockers, for example, if they are two-tier lockers. In short, the total number of lockers is the bank size multiplied by the number of tiers. Sometimes the term "bay" is used instead of "bank", although "bank" appears to be the more standard term; on other occasions, "bay" refers to a single locker width within a bank, including all tiers of locker directly on top of each other.
Lockers are only available to currently enrolled students and current employees.  The University is not responsible for the contents of any locker.  Users must use the lock provided by Roosevelt University.  No stickers or posters are allowed on the lockers.  No dangerous or illegal items may be stored in lockers at any time.  Items causing unpleasant odors are not allowed.  Lockers must be able to be fully closed at all times.   Roosevelt University reserves the right to open lockers at its discretion at any time and to remove any items it believes compromises the safety or environmental quality of Roosevelt University.   Roosevelt University reserves the rights to charge for damages to the locker and may cancel this rental agreement at any time for any reason.
Dimensions (Note that, in English-speaking countries, even those commonly using metric measurements now, locker dimensions are usually clean numbers of inches or feet, while the corresponding metric measurements are uneven, involving decimal places when precision is required, presumably resulting from continued use of locker designs based on feet and inches, unchanged for decades other than for cosmetic features.):
There are plenty of convenient places to store your luggage in Denver, from downtown to Lincoln street to Capitol Hill and Commons park. The cost is just US$6 per day, and check in time is just 3 minutes. So basically, in the same time it took to make that instant cup of Ramen before rushing to the airport, you can be in and out the door with no luggage to weigh you down.
For longer term storage, there are many self storage units around the metro area. Not cheap, but then neither is paying extra baggage fees and lugging around extra stuff not needed for another leg of your trip, as it sounds like Terry might be doing. For example, I found "Downtown Denver Self Storage" with units starting at $45 a month. http://www.downtowndenverstorage.com/
Plastic Lockers are ideal for high-humidity applications, as these virtually maintenance-free lockers will never rust, rot, corrode or fade. These lockers are available in multiple configurations and are backed by a 15-year warranty. Optional configurations like Lattice Lockers, or doors with other non-standard vents can be obtained through ASI Storage Solutions. Please consult our customer service team to be advised on changes in pricing and delivery lead times for all non-standard items.
In the States everybody is so concerned about liability.... We tried to store at Hertz (where we dropped the rental); no storage facility, no luck. Try a hotel; I tried several, if you are not a guest then they are not allowed. I tried the Information Centre; no luck, they had some bad experiences.... in the past. But they could not realy help me any further. One advise: try the Greyhound Bus Center. And yes! there you can store your luggage. Even my somewhat bigger suitcase. The lockers are somewhat small but high and deep enough. First 3 hours is to be paid for; $ 3 and after that a dollar for an extra hour.

In schools without lockers, students are sometimes provided with two complete sets of textbooks, one set being kept at school for use in class, and the other being kept at home for referring to for homework, thus limiting the amount of heavy carrying that would otherwise be required without having lockers to store them in between classes.[1] However, research has shown an increase in the incidence of back injuries in some students, which has been directly attributed to the lack of lockers for storing books in, thus forcing students to spend more time carrying heavy loads of books in backpacks.
In the States everybody is so concerned about liability.... We tried to store at Hertz (where we dropped the rental); no storage facility, no luck. Try a hotel; I tried several, if you are not a guest then they are not allowed. I tried the Information Centre; no luck, they had some bad experiences.... in the past. But they could not realy help me any further. One advise: try the Greyhound Bus Center. And yes! there you can store your luggage. Even my somewhat bigger suitcase. The lockers are somewhat small but high and deep enough. First 3 hours is to be paid for; $ 3 and after that a dollar for an extra hour.

Stored my luggage for several hours at Lugden. Great location just across the street from Union Station. Spoke with the owner and he said he owns the parking spot so they are always there during the day. Prices were reasonable and I felt comfortable storing my bags there while I explored Denver. The owner was nice and gave me coupons for some local businesses.


I agree with the suggestion about shipping your skis and boots, especially if you are not going to be using them after the Vail portion of your trip. Are you staying in LA for awhile or just making a connection there? If you are staying at a hotel in LA perhaps you could talk to them about having your equipment shipped there and stored as most hotels do have some sort of luggage storage facility. Hikers on the Appalachian Trail often ship supplies to US post offices that are in towns easily accessible to the trail so they don't have to carry everything with them. A lot will depend on your actual itinerary and whether you are stopping over in LA or just making a connection. You'll likely need to do some research and maybe think outside the box. I know it's always much nicer to ski on equipment you are used to but renting might end up being your best bet and the least hassle.


The visually appealing and very durable Traditional Collection is our most widely distributed locker line. Offering the most value for typical locker applications, this collection is available in a full range of spacious sizes, from single- to six-tier configurations, as well as two-person, 16-person and wall-mounted. The addition of our new 2 person Z-Locker completes the Traditional collection. 
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